BE ALERT! IT’S A HIGH WIND WARNING

BE ALERT! IT'S A HIGH WIND WARNING

BE ALERT! IT’S A HIGH WIND WARNING

Be alert! It’s a high wind warning from the weather forecast. According to the National Weather Service, a high wind caution signifies that sustained winds of 40 mph for one hour and gusts of at least 58 mph are occurring or expected within the next 36 hours.

High winds are expected during stormy weather or high profile storms like tropical or hurricanes. But dangerously high winds can occur even on a clear day because the causes of windstorms are decreased temperature.

BE ALERT! IT'S A HIGH WIND WARNING

Cold air is called ‘high-pressure systems’ because gas particles are bundled together in cold air and spread out as the atmosphere warms, so warm air is referred to as ‘low-pressure systems.

When these systems collide, air rushes from the higher pressure area to lower the pressure area, creating wind. The wind will be faster if the pressure gradient is more considerable. 

Atmospheric pressure changes cause gusts of air to rush in to fill low-pressure zones, resulting in heavy winds. Strong winds can result in felled trees and electrical lines, flying debris, and building collapses, resulting in power outages, communication disruptions, property damage, disability, and death.

These intense winds can also make travel difficult, particularly for high-profile vehicles like semi-trucks and large SUVs. Trees and branches come slamming down on cars below.

BE ALERT! IT’S A HIGH WIND WARNING

In some cases, streets are blocked with large trees down the road. These winds can also knock people down heading outside or walking their pets.                                                                                          

Some preventive measures advised to minimize the loss through these high winds are given below:   

  • Get indoors if possible when high winds are occurring. Stay away from windows move to the basement or the lowest interior room.
  • If you are stuck outside in high winds, seek the safest shelter possible. This could be a building or an exterior below-ground stairwell. The safest place in the open may be face down in a ditch or low-lying grounds.
  • Driving during high winds reduces your speed and keeps plenty of room between your car and others. Grip the wheels firmly with both hands.
  • Check out your local electrical utility if you detect a downed power line. Please don’t go near them because they can electrify puddles and even the moisture in the ground.

Hence you’d better be alert! It’s a high wind warning. 

By: Bahaar Abdullah

hi I'm Bill :)

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.